Notes from the Field

Adamo embarks on PolarTREC in the Alps

1200x400 PolarTREC

Our very own Dr. Lauren Neitzke Adamo has been selected for a PolarTREC Expedition to the Swiss Alps to study the sliding rate of glaciers!

PolarTREC (Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating) is a program that selects formal and informal educators to spend 3 to 6 weeks participating in hands-on research in the Arctic and Antarctic with the goal of increasing interest and awareness of polar science. The program, funded by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS), began about 10 years ago and has already provided more than 150 teachers with hands-on field research experience.

Read more: Adamo embarks on PolarTREC in the Alps

Rutgers faculty and students on the R/V Atlantis research cruise

Welcome Aboard the Research Vessel Atlantis, Cruise AT40-03

Welcome the not-so-regular daily blog we're keeping aboard the R/V Atlantis. "We" are 19 members of a science and technical team contributing to a research cruise that's the prelim to drilling by the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP). Images of seafloor topography and sub-seafloor layering we collect will enable us to choose sites to be drilled by the IODP, using the D/V JOIDES Resolution 2 to 3 years from now. That effort will recover records of Earth history that can be acquired in no other way than by putting out to sea and drilling hundreds of meters into the seafloor at key locations. We expect the sediments brought up from the depths will reveal ocean-atmosphere-biosphere interaction spanning the last 70 million years. The goal will be to improve knowledge of past climate variations and the factors that regulate the flow of deep ocean water that begins in the North Atlantic and circles the globe.

AtlantisAtlantis Image Courtesy of WHOI

Read more: Rutgers faculty and students on the R/V Atlantis research cruise

Olsson publishes new Atlas of Oligocene Planktonic Foraminifera

Olsson publishes new Atlas of Oligocene Planktonic Foraminifera

 

Congratulations to Emeritus Professor Richard Olsson and co-authors on their recent book, Atlas of Oligocene Planktonic Foraminifera!  This is the third book in a larger series, and follows atlases on the Paleocene (by Olsson and others, 1999) and the Eocene. This Special Publication provides updates the taxonomy, paleoecology, phylogeny, and biostratigraphy of the diverse groups of Oligocene planktonic foraminifera, and will serve as an invaluable guide for paleontologists focusing on this epoch in Earth history.

Undergraduate Researchers Present in Northeastern GSA

On March 19th and 20th, Rutgers seismology group attended the Northeastern sectional meeting of GSA, held in Burlington, Vermont. In the session aiming to integrate geology and geophysics, our undergraduates, Stephen Elkington and Janine Hlavaty, contributed results from their research investigating the upper mantle rock textures beneath New England. The talk was masterfully presented by Steve. The study was done in conjunction with the Aresty Research Assistant Program (https://aresty.rutgers.edu/our-programs/research-assistant-program), and will be presented by Janine and Steve once again at the Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium in April.

SteveShipRock

First EPS Publication in The Astrophysical Journal Letters

Chondrules are melt spherules in meteorites. Whether chondrules are universally primitive condensates from the solar nebula or spherules produced by planetesimal collisions during planetary accretion is uncertain. Emeritus Professor Roger Hewins and Ph.D. alumna Claire Condie defined the formation conditions of some unusual chondrules, which partially remelted during cooling (see Condie’s 2012 EPS Ph.D. thesis). Melissa Morris’ group at SUNY Cortlandt used Condie’s data to conduct 3D modeling of an impact plume with the adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH4. They found heating spikes in compressed parcels of gas like those in crystallization experiments. The agreement between the geological experiments from Rutgers and the astrophysical models from SUNY Cortlandt supports formation of these chondrules by collision of planetesimals

Read more: First EPS Publication in The Astrophysical Journal Letters

EPS celebrates graduates at Commencement 2018

Rutgers University celebrated Graduation on May 13, 2018. The day was cold and rainy, but did not dampen spirits. EPS celebrated its Geological Sciences graduates (here taking shelter within the Rutgers Stadium at the SAS Convocation). Pictured are Bachelor's degree recipients Trevor Tibbrine, Tiffany Otai, Julie Fircha, Amy Bottge, Kyle Cusack, and Michael Debones, accompanied by Undergraduate Program Director Gail Ashley. Also receiving Bachelor's degrees were Orion Farr and Morris Peshtani. The following students also received Master's degrees from EPS during the past academic year: Rachel Filo, Gabe Gallegos, Michael Klaser, and Jon Lacarrubba.

EPS celebrates graduates at Commencement 2018

Rutgers Earth and Planetary Sciences (EPS) Book Cliffs, UT Field Trip, May 31-June 6, 2017

group3

Rutgers Earth and Planetary Sciences (EPS) Book Cliffs, UT Field Trip, May 31-June 6, 2017 Rutgers EPS Professors Ken Miller and Greg Mountain led 15 graduate students (including student collaborators from Haifa and Dalhousie Universities) on an exploration of the Book Cliffs of Utah and other geological highlights in the Helper/Price, Green River, and Moab areas. We explored “The Birthplace”, not of football but of outcrop sequence and parasequence stratigraphy, pioneered in the 1980’s and 1990’s by Exxon Production Research Company.

Read more: Rutgers Earth and Planetary Sciences (EPS) Book Cliffs, UT Field Trip, May 31-June 6, 2017

D/V JOIDES Resolution in the Western Pacific, International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 363

Yair1Rutgers is well represented during Expedition 363! From left: Gregory Mountain (Faculty in EPS), Tali Babila (former student in Oceanography, now at University of California, Santa Cruz), Samantha Bova (new Post-Doc in Oceanography), and Yair Rosenthal (Co-Chief Scientist, Faculty in EPS). (Credit: William Crawford & IODP JRSO) [Photo ID: exp363_134]

Read more: D/V JOIDES Resolution in the Western Pacific, International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 363